World News
10/21/2019 US may now keep some troops in Syria to guard oil fields

US may now keep some troops in Syria to guard oil fieldsThe Pentagon chief said the plan was still in the discussion phase and had not yet been presented to President Donald Trump, who has repeatedly said the Islamic State has been defeated. Esper emphasized that the proposal to leave a small number of troops in eastern Syria was intended to give the president "maneuver room" and wasn't final.


10/21/2019 Israel's Netanyahu gives up on forming new coalition

Israel's Netanyahu gives up on forming new coalitionIsrael's president says Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has ended his quest to form a new coalition — a step that pushes the country into new political uncertainty. Netanyahu fell short of securing a 61-seat parliamentary majority in last month's national election. Netanyahu had hoped to form a broad "unity" government with his chief rival, former military chief Benny Gantz.


10/21/2019 ‘This is oil country’: Newly painted Greta Thunberg mural defaced

‘This is oil country’: Newly painted Greta Thunberg mural defacedA mural of teenage climate activist Greta Thunberg has been defaced with pro-oil and derogatory messages days after it was created.The vast artwork appears to depict the Swedish campaigner during her United Nations speech last month when she criticised world leaders for their “betrayal” of young people through their inertia over the climate crisis.


10/21/2019 A vote against Brexit timetable is a vote against Oct. 31 departure -UK govt

A vote against Brexit timetable is a vote against Oct. 31 departure -UK govtBritish lawmakers who do not support the government's planned timetable to pass legislation to ratify its Brexit deal will be voting not to leave the European Union on Oct. 31, the leader of the House of Commons Jacob Rees-Mogg said on Monday. The government said it planned for the legislation to complete its House of Commons stages by the end of Thursday, prompting anger from many lawmakers that the tight schedule would not provide enough time to properly scrutinise the legislation. Lawmakers will on Tuesday be asked to approve the proposed timetable, known as the programme motion.


10/21/2019 Putin removes critical voices from his rights council

Putin removes critical voices from his rights councilRussian President Vladimir Putin has removed several opposition figures from his human rights council, a decree published Monday showed, with critics saying the move robs the advisory body of its legitimacy. The 50-member body, which has spoken out against abuses, has gradually been losing influence and many respected members of the human rights community have already quit in protest at various Kremlin actions. Five people will be removed from the council including its veteran head Mikhail Fedotov, according to the presidential decree on the government website.


10/21/2019 Far-Right death threat to German politician

Far-Right death threat to German politicianPolice in Germany are investigating suspected far-Right death threats against a senior politician from Angela Merkel’s Christian Democrat party (CDU) ahead of regional elections this weekend. The threats are being taken seriously in the wake of this month’s far-Right attack on a synagogue in Halle and the assassination of a politician by a suspected far-Right gunman in June. Mike Mohring, the CDU’s lead candidate in regional elections in the eastern state of Thuringia, on Sunday made public details of a threatening email he received. The anonymous email threatened him with “countermeasures” including stabbing and a car bomb attack unless he withdraws from the election. “If you don’t heed this warning the same will happen to you as happened to Henriette Reker,” the email says, referring to the mayor of Cologne who survived a stabbing at an election rally in 2015. “We will try to stab you at your next public event, and if that fails, you can expect a car bomb or some other form of assassination,” it goes on. The email is signed “The musicians of the Reich State Orchestra” — a clear reference to the Nazi regime . Police are already investigating a number of other threats to high-profile figures signed in the same way. Walter Luebcke was assassinated outside his home by a suspected far-Right gunman in June  Credit: UWE ZUCCHI/DPA Police are also investigating a postcard sent to Mr Mohring in September which threatened he would be “number two to get a shot in the head”. The wording is believed to be a reference to the assassination of Walter Lübcke, a prominent CDU politician who was shot dead by a suspected far-Right gunman outside his home in June. Mr Lübcke was an outspoken supporter of Mrs Merkel’s former “open door” migrant policy. Mr Mohring is leading the CDU campaign to regain control of Thuringia from the Left Party in Sunday’s elections. The campaign has been overshadowed by the far-Right attack in nearby Halle earlier this month. Stephan Balliet failed in his attempt to massacre more than 50 people marking Yom Kippuer in the city’s synagogue, but shot dead two random passers by. The latest polls suggest the fall-out from the attack has led to a drop in support for the nationalist Alternative for Germany party (AfD), which is currently in third place on 20 per cent. Rival politicians accused the party of stoking anti-Semitic feeling which led to the Halle attack — a charge AfD leaders have denied. The CDU and the Left Party are currently neck-and-neck ahead of Sunday’s vote, on 27 per cent each.


10/21/2019 US defence secretary in Saudi Arabia on unannounced visit

US defence secretary in Saudi Arabia on unannounced visitUS Secretary of Defence Mark Esper arrived Monday in Saudi Arabia, state television said, days after the Pentagon said it was bolstering its forces in the kingdom amid tensions with Iran. Al-Ekhbariyah television gave no details on the previously unannounced visit, which comes after Esper visited Afghanistan. On October 11, the Pentagon said it was deploying new US troops to Saudi Arabia after Riyadh asked for reinforcements following a mid-September drone and missile attack on Saudi oil plants, which Washington blames on Iran.


10/21/2019 Speaker Denies Johnson New Vote on Divorce Deal: Brexit Update

Speaker Denies Johnson New Vote on Divorce Deal: Brexit Update(Bloomberg) -- Follow @Brexit, sign up to our Brexit Bulletin, and tell us your Brexit story. Boris Johnson was thwarted in his latest attempt to get his Brexit deal approved in Parliament, in another blow to his effort to take the U.K. out of the European Union in 10 days’ time.House of Commons Speaker John Bercow rejected the government’s bid to trigger a second parliamentary vote on the Brexit deal the prime minister secured last week in Brussels.Bercow said members of Parliament had already debated and voted on Johnson’s deal in principle in a rare sitting on Saturday -- two days ago -- and they had decided to delay taking a final decision on whether to approve or reject it.The prime minister cannot keep asking MPs to answer the same question in an attempt to get them to change their minds, Bercow said, citing a parliamentary convention dating back to 1604.“It is clear that the motions are in substance the same,” Bercow said. “My ruling is therefore that the motion will not be debated today as it would be repetitive and disorderly to do so.”On Saturday, Parliament voted to postpone a final verdict on Johnson’s Brexit deal until after detailed legislation has been passed to implement it, a move designed to prevent the U.K. accidentally tumbling out of the EU with no deal.Johnson has vowed repeatedly to force the U.K. out of the EU with or without a deal by the current Oct. 31 deadline. He will now attempt to fast-track the draft law to implement his exit agreement through Parliament over the next 10 days, as he battles to deliver Brexit on time.“We’re disappointed that the Speaker has yet again denied us the chance to deliver on the will of the British people,” Johnson’s spokesman told reporters.Betrayal, Jealousy and Cliff Edges: Johnson’s Brexit MinefieldKey Developments:Speaker John Bercow ruled a second vote on Johnson’s Brexit deal cannot take place on MondayMinisters said Sunday the government has enough support in Parliament to get Johnson’s Brexit deal ratifiedDUP’s Jim Shannon says the party won’t back an amendment to the deal to keep the U.K. in a customs union with the EU, after Labour said it is seeking support for such a moveGovernment says it will introduce Brexit bill on MondayPound trades near a five-month high on speculation Johnson will win MPs’ backing for his Brexit deal this weekGovernment Plans 3 Commons Days in Brexit Bill (5:55 p.m.)Leader of the House of Commons Jacob Rees-Mogg set out the accelerated schedule on which the government hopes to get the Withdrawal Agreement Bill through the chamber. He said it’ll complete all its stages by Thursday Oct. 24. That implies:Tuesday: Second Reading and so-called program motionWednesday: Committee StageThursday: Third ReadingBut all that depends on the program motion passing, and opposition MPs are complaining that this timetable leaves them no space to scrutinize the bill.Johnson Attacks Bercow Over Vote Rejection (5:30 p.m.)Boris Johnson’s spokesman, James Slack, attacked John Bercow’s decision not to let members of Parliament vote again on the prime minister’s Brexit deal. “We’re disappointed that the Speaker has yet again denied us the chance to deliver on the will of the British people,” Slack told reporters.Johnson earlier spoke to David Sassoli, president of the European Parliament, and urged him to get the Brexit deal ratified on his side by Oct. 31, Slack said.Corbyn Demands Economic Impact Assessment (4:30 p.m.)Opposition Labour Party Leader Jeremy Corbyn put an urgent question to the government, calling for ministers to publish an assessment of the economic impact of the exit deal Boris Johnson brokered last week with the EU.Earlier on Monday, Chancellor of the Exchequer Sajid Javid said in a letter to Parliament’s Treasury Select Committee that there’s no need for an impact assessment because the benefits of the deal are “self-evidently in our economic interest.”Bercow Bans New Vote on Brexit Deal Today (3:40 p.m.)Commons Speaker John Bercow threw another obstacle in Johnson’s way, rejecting the prime minister’s attempt to put his Brexit deal to another vote, just two days after MPs debated it.Bercow cited a parliamentary rule dating back to 1604 under which the government cannot repeatedly ask Parliament to vote on the exact same motion.“It is clear that the motions are in substance the same,” Bercow said. “My ruling is therefore that the motion will not be debated today as it would be repetitive and disorderly to do so.”Judges Extend Decision on Johnson, Benn Act (1 p.m.)Scottish judges held off on ruling on a case brought by opponents of a no-deal Brexit to ensure that Prime Minister Boris Johnson complies with a law requiring he reach an agreement with the European Union on leaving or postponing the country’s departure.The panel didn’t set a date for the next hearing when releasing their decision in Edinburgh on Monday. The opponents are seeking a continuation to ensure that Johnson accepts an extension from the EU if it’s offered.Johnson Would Pull Vote on Deal If MPs Amend It (11:30 a.m.)Boris Johnson’s spokesman said the government would pull a planned “meaningful vote” on its Brexit deal if Members of Parliament “render it pointless” with amendments, the prime minister’s spokesman told reporters in London. In any case, the vote would only go ahead if Speaker of the House of Commons John Bercow allows it, James Slack said.The government wants to hold a second reading of its Brexit Withdrawal Agreement Bill on Tuesday, Slack said. It will be published once it’s introduced to the House of Commons later on Monday. He said the government aims to submit its so-called program motion on Tuesday to fast-track the legislation, but is also holding discussions on when to pull the draft law if amendments take it too far from the deal agreed with the EU.Slack also said negotiations with Northern Ireland’s Democratic Unionist Party, which the government still considers to be its partner in Parliament, are ongoing to try to persuade its MPs to back Johnson’s Brexit deal.Government to Introduce Brexit Bill (10:15 a.m.)The U.K. government confirmed it will introduce its Withdrawal Agreement Bill, the crucial piece of law that will incorporate Boris Johnson’s Brexit deal into British statute, on Monday.“MPs and peers will today have in front of them a bill that will get Brexit done by October 31, protect jobs and the integrity of the U.K., and enable us to move onto the people’s priorities like health, education and crime,” Brexit Secretary Steve Barclay said in an emailed statement. “If Parliament wants to respect the referendum, it must back the bill.”DUP Will Not Support Customs Union: Shannon (9:30 a.m.)Democratic Unionist Party MP Jim Shannon told Sky News his party is “meeting shortly” to discuss issues including potential amendments to the government’s Brexit legislation, but ruled out backing any move to keep the U.K. in the European Union’s customs union.“We are clear where we stand on the customs union, that’s something that the cannot support and will not support,” Shannon said.The comments come after the main opposition Labour Party’s Brexit spokesman, Keir Starmer, said his party would back amendments on a second referendum and a customs union, and made a direct appeal to the DUP to rethink their opposition to the latter. Getting an amendment through the House of Commons would likely require the DUP’s votes.Baker: Will Compromise to Get U.K. Out of EU (Earlier)Steve Baker, chairman of the Conservative Party’s European Research Group pro-Brexit caucus, told BBC Radio on Monday his colleagues are prepared to compromise to get the U.K. out of the European Union on Oct. 31.His advice to the group is “that we should number one back the deal, number two vote for the legislation all the way through unless it was wrecked by opponents,” Baker said, though he notably did not rule out accepting a deal that keeps the U.K. in the EU’s customs union.“For people like me, vast areas of that Withdrawal Agreement are unchanged and we are going to have to choke down our pride and vote in the national interest to get Brexit done,” he said.Earlier:Johnson’s Battle to Deliver Brexit: Here’s What Happens NextJohnson Might Yet Get Brexit Done: Counting the VotesU.K. Starts ‘No-Deal’ Brexit Preparations as EU Poised to Delay\--With assistance from Christopher Elser, Greg Ritchie, Jessica Shankleman, Andrew Atkinson, Robert Hutton and Tiago Ramos Alfaro.To contact the reporters on this story: Alex Morales in London at amorales2@bloomberg.net;Kitty Donaldson in London at kdonaldson1@bloomberg.net;Robert Hutton in London at rhutton1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Tim Ross at tross54@bloomberg.net, ;Flavia Krause-Jackson at fjackson@bloomberg.net, Stuart BiggsFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


10/21/2019 Congo's Ebola outbreak, now concentrated in a gold mining area, remains a global emergency: WHO

Congo's Ebola outbreak, now concentrated in a gold mining area, remains a global emergency: WHOThe World Health Organization says the ongoing Ebola outbreak in the eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo continues to pose an international emergency as the deadly virus emerges in a remote gold mining area. The global health arm of the United Nations convened its technical advisory committee on Friday to review the situation since first declaring the Ebola epidemic -- the second-deadliest in history -- a "public health emergency of international concern" on July 17.


10/21/2019 Dozens of elephants die in Zimbabwe drought

Dozens of elephants die in Zimbabwe droughtAt least 55 elephants have died in a month in Zimbabwe due to a lack of food and water, its wildlife agency said Monday, as the country faces one of the worst droughts in its history. More than five million rural Zimbabweans -- nearly a third of the population -- are at risk of food shortages before the next harvest in 2020, the United Nations has warned. The shortages have been caused by the combined effects of an economic downturn and a drought blamed on the El Nino weather cycle.


World News
10/21/2019 US may now keep some troops in Syria to guard oil fields

US may now keep some troops in Syria to guard oil fieldsThe Pentagon chief said the plan was still in the discussion phase and had not yet been presented to President Donald Trump, who has repeatedly said the Islamic State has been defeated. Esper emphasized that the proposal to leave a small number of troops in eastern Syria was intended to give the president "maneuver room" and wasn't final.


10/21/2019 Israel's Netanyahu gives up on forming new coalition

Israel's Netanyahu gives up on forming new coalitionIsrael's president says Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has ended his quest to form a new coalition — a step that pushes the country into new political uncertainty. Netanyahu fell short of securing a 61-seat parliamentary majority in last month's national election. Netanyahu had hoped to form a broad "unity" government with his chief rival, former military chief Benny Gantz.


10/21/2019 ‘This is oil country’: Newly painted Greta Thunberg mural defaced

‘This is oil country’: Newly painted Greta Thunberg mural defacedA mural of teenage climate activist Greta Thunberg has been defaced with pro-oil and derogatory messages days after it was created.The vast artwork appears to depict the Swedish campaigner during her United Nations speech last month when she criticised world leaders for their “betrayal” of young people through their inertia over the climate crisis.


10/21/2019 A vote against Brexit timetable is a vote against Oct. 31 departure -UK govt

A vote against Brexit timetable is a vote against Oct. 31 departure -UK govtBritish lawmakers who do not support the government's planned timetable to pass legislation to ratify its Brexit deal will be voting not to leave the European Union on Oct. 31, the leader of the House of Commons Jacob Rees-Mogg said on Monday. The government said it planned for the legislation to complete its House of Commons stages by the end of Thursday, prompting anger from many lawmakers that the tight schedule would not provide enough time to properly scrutinise the legislation. Lawmakers will on Tuesday be asked to approve the proposed timetable, known as the programme motion.


10/21/2019 Putin removes critical voices from his rights council

Putin removes critical voices from his rights councilRussian President Vladimir Putin has removed several opposition figures from his human rights council, a decree published Monday showed, with critics saying the move robs the advisory body of its legitimacy. The 50-member body, which has spoken out against abuses, has gradually been losing influence and many respected members of the human rights community have already quit in protest at various Kremlin actions. Five people will be removed from the council including its veteran head Mikhail Fedotov, according to the presidential decree on the government website.


10/21/2019 Far-Right death threat to German politician

Far-Right death threat to German politicianPolice in Germany are investigating suspected far-Right death threats against a senior politician from Angela Merkel’s Christian Democrat party (CDU) ahead of regional elections this weekend. The threats are being taken seriously in the wake of this month’s far-Right attack on a synagogue in Halle and the assassination of a politician by a suspected far-Right gunman in June. Mike Mohring, the CDU’s lead candidate in regional elections in the eastern state of Thuringia, on Sunday made public details of a threatening email he received. The anonymous email threatened him with “countermeasures” including stabbing and a car bomb attack unless he withdraws from the election. “If you don’t heed this warning the same will happen to you as happened to Henriette Reker,” the email says, referring to the mayor of Cologne who survived a stabbing at an election rally in 2015. “We will try to stab you at your next public event, and if that fails, you can expect a car bomb or some other form of assassination,” it goes on. The email is signed “The musicians of the Reich State Orchestra” — a clear reference to the Nazi regime . Police are already investigating a number of other threats to high-profile figures signed in the same way. Walter Luebcke was assassinated outside his home by a suspected far-Right gunman in June  Credit: UWE ZUCCHI/DPA Police are also investigating a postcard sent to Mr Mohring in September which threatened he would be “number two to get a shot in the head”. The wording is believed to be a reference to the assassination of Walter Lübcke, a prominent CDU politician who was shot dead by a suspected far-Right gunman outside his home in June. Mr Lübcke was an outspoken supporter of Mrs Merkel’s former “open door” migrant policy. Mr Mohring is leading the CDU campaign to regain control of Thuringia from the Left Party in Sunday’s elections. The campaign has been overshadowed by the far-Right attack in nearby Halle earlier this month. Stephan Balliet failed in his attempt to massacre more than 50 people marking Yom Kippuer in the city’s synagogue, but shot dead two random passers by. The latest polls suggest the fall-out from the attack has led to a drop in support for the nationalist Alternative for Germany party (AfD), which is currently in third place on 20 per cent. Rival politicians accused the party of stoking anti-Semitic feeling which led to the Halle attack — a charge AfD leaders have denied. The CDU and the Left Party are currently neck-and-neck ahead of Sunday’s vote, on 27 per cent each.


10/21/2019 US defence secretary in Saudi Arabia on unannounced visit

US defence secretary in Saudi Arabia on unannounced visitUS Secretary of Defence Mark Esper arrived Monday in Saudi Arabia, state television said, days after the Pentagon said it was bolstering its forces in the kingdom amid tensions with Iran. Al-Ekhbariyah television gave no details on the previously unannounced visit, which comes after Esper visited Afghanistan. On October 11, the Pentagon said it was deploying new US troops to Saudi Arabia after Riyadh asked for reinforcements following a mid-September drone and missile attack on Saudi oil plants, which Washington blames on Iran.


10/21/2019 Speaker Denies Johnson New Vote on Divorce Deal: Brexit Update

Speaker Denies Johnson New Vote on Divorce Deal: Brexit Update(Bloomberg) -- Follow @Brexit, sign up to our Brexit Bulletin, and tell us your Brexit story. Boris Johnson was thwarted in his latest attempt to get his Brexit deal approved in Parliament, in another blow to his effort to take the U.K. out of the European Union in 10 days’ time.House of Commons Speaker John Bercow rejected the government’s bid to trigger a second parliamentary vote on the Brexit deal the prime minister secured last week in Brussels.Bercow said members of Parliament had already debated and voted on Johnson’s deal in principle in a rare sitting on Saturday -- two days ago -- and they had decided to delay taking a final decision on whether to approve or reject it.The prime minister cannot keep asking MPs to answer the same question in an attempt to get them to change their minds, Bercow said, citing a parliamentary convention dating back to 1604.“It is clear that the motions are in substance the same,” Bercow said. “My ruling is therefore that the motion will not be debated today as it would be repetitive and disorderly to do so.”On Saturday, Parliament voted to postpone a final verdict on Johnson’s Brexit deal until after detailed legislation has been passed to implement it, a move designed to prevent the U.K. accidentally tumbling out of the EU with no deal.Johnson has vowed repeatedly to force the U.K. out of the EU with or without a deal by the current Oct. 31 deadline. He will now attempt to fast-track the draft law to implement his exit agreement through Parliament over the next 10 days, as he battles to deliver Brexit on time.“We’re disappointed that the Speaker has yet again denied us the chance to deliver on the will of the British people,” Johnson’s spokesman told reporters.Betrayal, Jealousy and Cliff Edges: Johnson’s Brexit MinefieldKey Developments:Speaker John Bercow ruled a second vote on Johnson’s Brexit deal cannot take place on MondayMinisters said Sunday the government has enough support in Parliament to get Johnson’s Brexit deal ratifiedDUP’s Jim Shannon says the party won’t back an amendment to the deal to keep the U.K. in a customs union with the EU, after Labour said it is seeking support for such a moveGovernment says it will introduce Brexit bill on MondayPound trades near a five-month high on speculation Johnson will win MPs’ backing for his Brexit deal this weekGovernment Plans 3 Commons Days in Brexit Bill (5:55 p.m.)Leader of the House of Commons Jacob Rees-Mogg set out the accelerated schedule on which the government hopes to get the Withdrawal Agreement Bill through the chamber. He said it’ll complete all its stages by Thursday Oct. 24. That implies:Tuesday: Second Reading and so-called program motionWednesday: Committee StageThursday: Third ReadingBut all that depends on the program motion passing, and opposition MPs are complaining that this timetable leaves them no space to scrutinize the bill.Johnson Attacks Bercow Over Vote Rejection (5:30 p.m.)Boris Johnson’s spokesman, James Slack, attacked John Bercow’s decision not to let members of Parliament vote again on the prime minister’s Brexit deal. “We’re disappointed that the Speaker has yet again denied us the chance to deliver on the will of the British people,” Slack told reporters.Johnson earlier spoke to David Sassoli, president of the European Parliament, and urged him to get the Brexit deal ratified on his side by Oct. 31, Slack said.Corbyn Demands Economic Impact Assessment (4:30 p.m.)Opposition Labour Party Leader Jeremy Corbyn put an urgent question to the government, calling for ministers to publish an assessment of the economic impact of the exit deal Boris Johnson brokered last week with the EU.Earlier on Monday, Chancellor of the Exchequer Sajid Javid said in a letter to Parliament’s Treasury Select Committee that there’s no need for an impact assessment because the benefits of the deal are “self-evidently in our economic interest.”Bercow Bans New Vote on Brexit Deal Today (3:40 p.m.)Commons Speaker John Bercow threw another obstacle in Johnson’s way, rejecting the prime minister’s attempt to put his Brexit deal to another vote, just two days after MPs debated it.Bercow cited a parliamentary rule dating back to 1604 under which the government cannot repeatedly ask Parliament to vote on the exact same motion.“It is clear that the motions are in substance the same,” Bercow said. “My ruling is therefore that the motion will not be debated today as it would be repetitive and disorderly to do so.”Judges Extend Decision on Johnson, Benn Act (1 p.m.)Scottish judges held off on ruling on a case brought by opponents of a no-deal Brexit to ensure that Prime Minister Boris Johnson complies with a law requiring he reach an agreement with the European Union on leaving or postponing the country’s departure.The panel didn’t set a date for the next hearing when releasing their decision in Edinburgh on Monday. The opponents are seeking a continuation to ensure that Johnson accepts an extension from the EU if it’s offered.Johnson Would Pull Vote on Deal If MPs Amend It (11:30 a.m.)Boris Johnson’s spokesman said the government would pull a planned “meaningful vote” on its Brexit deal if Members of Parliament “render it pointless” with amendments, the prime minister’s spokesman told reporters in London. In any case, the vote would only go ahead if Speaker of the House of Commons John Bercow allows it, James Slack said.The government wants to hold a second reading of its Brexit Withdrawal Agreement Bill on Tuesday, Slack said. It will be published once it’s introduced to the House of Commons later on Monday. He said the government aims to submit its so-called program motion on Tuesday to fast-track the legislation, but is also holding discussions on when to pull the draft law if amendments take it too far from the deal agreed with the EU.Slack also said negotiations with Northern Ireland’s Democratic Unionist Party, which the government still considers to be its partner in Parliament, are ongoing to try to persuade its MPs to back Johnson’s Brexit deal.Government to Introduce Brexit Bill (10:15 a.m.)The U.K. government confirmed it will introduce its Withdrawal Agreement Bill, the crucial piece of law that will incorporate Boris Johnson’s Brexit deal into British statute, on Monday.“MPs and peers will today have in front of them a bill that will get Brexit done by October 31, protect jobs and the integrity of the U.K., and enable us to move onto the people’s priorities like health, education and crime,” Brexit Secretary Steve Barclay said in an emailed statement. “If Parliament wants to respect the referendum, it must back the bill.”DUP Will Not Support Customs Union: Shannon (9:30 a.m.)Democratic Unionist Party MP Jim Shannon told Sky News his party is “meeting shortly” to discuss issues including potential amendments to the government’s Brexit legislation, but ruled out backing any move to keep the U.K. in the European Union’s customs union.“We are clear where we stand on the customs union, that’s something that the cannot support and will not support,” Shannon said.The comments come after the main opposition Labour Party’s Brexit spokesman, Keir Starmer, said his party would back amendments on a second referendum and a customs union, and made a direct appeal to the DUP to rethink their opposition to the latter. Getting an amendment through the House of Commons would likely require the DUP’s votes.Baker: Will Compromise to Get U.K. Out of EU (Earlier)Steve Baker, chairman of the Conservative Party’s European Research Group pro-Brexit caucus, told BBC Radio on Monday his colleagues are prepared to compromise to get the U.K. out of the European Union on Oct. 31.His advice to the group is “that we should number one back the deal, number two vote for the legislation all the way through unless it was wrecked by opponents,” Baker said, though he notably did not rule out accepting a deal that keeps the U.K. in the EU’s customs union.“For people like me, vast areas of that Withdrawal Agreement are unchanged and we are going to have to choke down our pride and vote in the national interest to get Brexit done,” he said.Earlier:Johnson’s Battle to Deliver Brexit: Here’s What Happens NextJohnson Might Yet Get Brexit Done: Counting the VotesU.K. Starts ‘No-Deal’ Brexit Preparations as EU Poised to Delay\--With assistance from Christopher Elser, Greg Ritchie, Jessica Shankleman, Andrew Atkinson, Robert Hutton and Tiago Ramos Alfaro.To contact the reporters on this story: Alex Morales in London at amorales2@bloomberg.net;Kitty Donaldson in London at kdonaldson1@bloomberg.net;Robert Hutton in London at rhutton1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Tim Ross at tross54@bloomberg.net, ;Flavia Krause-Jackson at fjackson@bloomberg.net, Stuart BiggsFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


10/21/2019 Congo's Ebola outbreak, now concentrated in a gold mining area, remains a global emergency: WHO

Congo's Ebola outbreak, now concentrated in a gold mining area, remains a global emergency: WHOThe World Health Organization says the ongoing Ebola outbreak in the eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo continues to pose an international emergency as the deadly virus emerges in a remote gold mining area. The global health arm of the United Nations convened its technical advisory committee on Friday to review the situation since first declaring the Ebola epidemic -- the second-deadliest in history -- a "public health emergency of international concern" on July 17.


10/21/2019 Dozens of elephants die in Zimbabwe drought

Dozens of elephants die in Zimbabwe droughtAt least 55 elephants have died in a month in Zimbabwe due to a lack of food and water, its wildlife agency said Monday, as the country faces one of the worst droughts in its history. More than five million rural Zimbabweans -- nearly a third of the population -- are at risk of food shortages before the next harvest in 2020, the United Nations has warned. The shortages have been caused by the combined effects of an economic downturn and a drought blamed on the El Nino weather cycle.